Signs and symptoms of womb cancer

If you have symptoms of womb cancer, you should go and see your GP.

Signs and symptoms

Usually the first sign of womb cancer is unusual vaginal bleeding. For example, this could be:

  • bleeding after the menopause (this is the most common symptom)
  • bleeding in between periods
  • heavier periods than usual (if you have not been through the menopause)
  • a bloody or pink and watery vaginal discharge.

Less common symptoms are pain or discomfort in the pelvic area, or pain during sex.

We understand that showing any symptoms of what could be cancer is worrying. The most important thing is to speak to your GP as soon as possible. We're also here if you need someone to talk to. You can:

When to see your GP

If you have any unusual vaginal bleeding, always see your GP about it. Other conditions that affect the womb, such as fibroids, can also cause unusual vaginal bleeding.

About our information

  • References

    Below is a sample of the sources used in our womb cancer information. If you would like more information about the sources we use, please contact us at cancerinformationteam@macmillan.org.uk

    Colombo N et al ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer: diagnosis, treatment and follow-up Annals of Oncology 27: 16–41, 2016.

    Sundar S et al BGCS uterine cancer guidelines: Recommendations for practice European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 213 (2017) 71–97.

    RCOG Fertility Sparing Treatments in Gynaecological Cancers 2013.

  • Reviewers

    This information has been written, revised and edited by Macmillan Cancer Support’s Cancer Information Development team. It has been reviewed by expert medical and health professionals and people living with cancer. It has been approved by Senior Medical Editor, Professor Nick Reed, Consultant Clinical Oncologist.

    Our cancer information has been awarded the PIF TICK. Created by the Patient Information Forum, this quality mark shows we meet PIF’s 10 criteria for trustworthy health information.

Content under review

Due to the pandemic, there have been delays in us updating this information as quickly as we would have wanted. Our team is working hard to put this right.

The language we use

We want everyone affected by cancer to feel our information is written for them.

We try to make sure our information is as clear as possible. We use plain English, avoid jargon, explain any medical words, use illustrations to explain text, and make sure important points are highlighted clearly.

We use gender-inclusive language and talk to our readers as ‘you’ so that everyone feels included. Where clinically necessary we use the terms ‘men’ and ‘women’ or ‘male’ and ‘female’. For example, we do so when talking about parts of the body or mentioning statistics or research about who is affected. Our aims are for our information to be as clear and relevant as possible for everyone.

You can read more about how we produce our information here.