About treatment for testicular cancer

The three main treatments for testicular cancer are:

If testicular cancer has spread to the lymph nodes at the back of the tummy (abdomen), some men may need surgery to remove the retroperitoneal lymph nodes.

After surgery to diagnose the cancer and remove the testicle your doctor will talk to you about surveillance. Surveillance is the option of monitoring you regularly in clinic. Or they may suggest you have further treatment.

Further treatment will depend on:

  • the stage of the cancer and the risk of it coming back
  • whether it is a non-seminoma or seminoma (see below).

Doctors also look at other factors such as, the size of the tumour and the levels of tumour markers, if present.

Treating stage 1 testicular cancer

Stage 1 testicular cancer is cancer that has not spread outside the testicle. Surgery to remove the testicle (orchidectomy) may be the only treatment some men need.

After orchidectomy, your doctor will talk to you about surveillance (monitoring) if the risk of the cancer coming back is low.

Your doctor may also offer you adjuvant chemotherapy treatment to reduce the risk of the cancer coming back.

Your doctor will explain why they have suggested adjuvant treatment. Your doctor and nurse will talk you through the benefits and disadvantages of each option and what might be best in your situation.

Some men may decide not to have treatment, and to have surveillance instead. They may want to avoid treatment that might not be necessary. Sometimes, men who have the option of surveillance decide to have chemotherapy instead.

Talk about the treatments with your doctor. Make sure you have enough information to help you make your decision.

Seminoma stage 1

If you have a stage 1 seminoma, your doctor may suggest you have surveillance (monitoring). This is if there is a low risk of the cancer coming back. You usually need to have regular clinic appointments for several years.

They may also offer you a single dose of adjuvant chemotherapy, with a drug called carboplatin.

Your doctors decide if you will benefit from adjuvant treatment based on:

  • the size of the tumour
  • how it looks under a microscope
  • the tumour marker levels (if present).

Non-seminoma stage 1

If you have a stage 1 non-seminoma, your doctor may suggest surveillance if there is a low risk of the cancer coming back. After a few years, if scans show no signs of the cancer coming back, you may only need regular blood tests.

They may also offer the option of adjuvant chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP). You may have 1 or 2 sessions. This will depend on:

  • how the cancer looks under a microscope
  • if it has spread to nearby blood vessels
  • the size of the tumour
  • the tumour marker levels (if present).

Rarely, your doctor may suggest further surgery to remove the lymph nodes at the back of the tummy (retroperitoneal lymph nodes).

Treating stages 2 to 4

If the cancer has spread outside your testicle, you have chemotherapy or occasionally radiotherapy, after having an orchidectomy. This will depend on the type of cancer.

Treatment can also depend on the stage of the cancer. Your doctors will talk to you about the treatment they think is best for you.

Seminoma

If you have a seminoma that has spread, your doctor may offer treatment with radiotherapy. Or they may offer you 3 or 4 courses of chemotherapy. Your doctor will talk with you about the treatment they think is best for you.

Non-seminoma

If you have a non-seminoma that has spread, you may need 3 or 4 sessions of chemotherapy. Some men need more intensive chemotherapy. This will depend on the stage of cancer, certain risk factors and how you respond to standard chemotherapy.

After chemotherapy, some men with a non-seminoma may need surgery to remove the retroperitoneal lymph nodes, if they are enlarged.

If testicular cancer comes back

If testicular cancer comes back, treatment can still usually cure it. This is even if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Effects of treatment on sex life and fertility

Treatments for testicular cancer can sometimes affect your ability to make someone pregnant (fertility). Doctors usually advise you to store your sperm (sperm banking) after, or sometimes before an orchidectomy.

Treatments do not affect your ability to have sex. But the emotional effects of your diagnosis and treatment side effects may reduce your sex drive for a while. There is different support available if you are having difficulties with your sex life.

We have more information about testicular cancer your sex life and fertility.

How we can help

Macmillan Grants

If you have cancer, you may be able to get a Macmillan Grant to help with the extra costs of cancer. Find out who can apply and how to access our grants.

0808 808 00 00
7 days a week, 8am - 8pm
Email us
Get in touch via this form
Chat online
7 days a week, 8am - 8pm
Online Community
An anonymous network of people affected by cancer which is free to join. Share experiences, ask questions and talk to people who understand.
Help in your area
What's going on near you? Find out about support groups, where to get information and how to get involved with Macmillan where you live.