A hepatic artery embolisation can sometimes shrink NETs in the liver. It can also relieve the symptoms of carcinoid syndrome.
A hepatic artery embolisation can sometimes shrink NETs in the liver. It can also relieve the symptoms of carcinoid syndrome. Tumours need a blood supply to survive. Hepatic artery embolisation works by reducing blood flow to the tumours.

The doctor gently puts a thin tube into the main blood vessel in your groin (the femoral artery). Guided by a scan, they slowly feed the tube into the main blood vessel of the liver (the hepatic artery). They then inject a drug that blocks the blood supply.

Sometimes the drug is combined with chemotherapy. This is called chemoembolisation. The highly concentrated chemotherapy stays in the tumour to kill some of the cells and shrink the tumour. Chemoembolisation is sometimes called TACE (trans-arterial chemoembolisation) or CT-ACE (computerised tomography guided arterial chemoembolisation).

You will probably stay in hospital overnight. You may feel sick, have tummy (abdominal) pain and a high temperature for a few days afterwards. Your doctor or nurse can give you more information.

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