Somatostatin analogues are drugs that treat the symptoms of carcinoid syndrome. They can help reduce flushing and diarrhoea.

Somatostatin analogues are drugs that treat the symptoms of carcinoid syndrome. They can help reduce flushing and diarrhoea. They work by stopping the body making too many hormones. They may also control the growth of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs).

The most commonly used somatostatin analogues are:

  • octreotide (Sandostatin®, Sandostatin Lar®)
  • lanreotide (Somatuline® LA, Somatuline Autogel®.

You will usually have the first few injections as an outpatient. They are given under the skin (subcutaneously) or into a muscle. You could have them:

  • up to 3 times a day, every day
  • once every 7 to 14 days
  • once every 28 days.

This will depend on your how symptoms respond to the treatment. Most people will have the injection every 28 days. A district nurse or practice nurse can give you the injections at home. Sometimes the nurse can show you, or a relative or friend, how to do the injections.