An ultrasound scan uses sound waves to build up a picture of internal organs. It can show changes in different organs and helps doctors to know if a lump or abnormal area is cancer or not.

You may have ultrasound scans to help diagnose:

An ultrasound scan happens in the hospital scanning department. The person doing the scan will explain more about the scan and help you lie down comfortably on your back.

You may have a:

  • Pelvic ultrasound
    You will be asked to drink plenty of water before this test so that your bladder is full. The person doing the scan will spread a gel on your tummy area (abdomen) and gently press a small hand-held device against your skin. This produces the sound waves.
  • Vaginal ultrasound
    The person doing the scan will gently put a small ultrasound probe into your vagina. The probe is about the size of a tampon and produces the sound waves. Although this scan sounds uncomfortable, some people find it easier than a pelvic ultrasound, as you do not need a full bladder.

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