A lump in the breast is the most common symptom of breast cancer, but there are others to look for.

It is important to see your GP if you have any of the following symptoms or notice anything that is unusual for you.

Possible signs and symptoms of breast cancer can include:

  • a lump in the breast
  • thickening of the skin or tissue of the breast, or dimpling of the skin of the breast
  • a lump or swelling in either armpit
  • a change in the shape or size of the breast, such as swelling in all or part of the breast
  • a nipple turning in (inverted nipple)
  • a rash (like eczema) on the nipple
  • discharge or bleeding from the nipple
  • pain or discomfort in the breast that does not go away, but this is rare.

A lump in the breast is the most common symptom of breast cancer, but most breast lumps are not cancer. They are usually lumps either filled with fluid (a cyst) or made up of fibrous and glandular tissue (fibroadenoma).

But it is very important to get any of these symptoms or anything else that is unusual for you checked by your GP.

The earlier breast cancer is diagnosed and treated, the more successful treatment is likely to be.

During pregnancy, a woman’s breast tissue changes and sometimes a lump or another breast cancer symptom could be confused with this. If you are pregnant and have any of these symptoms, it is important to see your doctor. Your symptoms should be checked in the same way as in women who are not pregnant.

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