The prostate gland

The prostate is a small gland only found in men. It’s about the size of a walnut and gets a little bigger with age. It surrounds the first part of the tube (urethra) that carries urine from the bladder along the penis.

Male reproductive organs
Male reproductive organs

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The prostate produces a thick, white fluid that mixes with the sperm from the testicles to make semen. It also produces a protein called prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that turns the semen into liquid.

The prostate gland is surrounded by a sheet of muscle and a fibrous capsule. The growth of prostate cells and the way the prostate gland works depend on the male sex hormone testosterone. This is produced in the testicles.

The back of the prostate gland is close to the rectum (back passage). Near the prostate are collections of lymph nodes. These are small glands, each about the size of a baked bean. They form part of the lymphatic system.

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About prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. It generally affects men over the age of 50.

What is cancer?

There are more than 200 different kinds of cancer, each with its own name and treatment.

How is it treated?

There are five main types of cancer treatment. You may receive one, or a combination of treatments, depending on your cancer type.