State Retirement Pension

The State Pension is a regular payment you can get from the government when you reach State Pension age.

State Pension age

The age you can claim your State Pension from depends on when you were born. You can check when you’ll reach State Pension age.

The State Pension age for men is currently 65. The State Pension Age for women is increasing to become 65 by November 2018.

From December 2018, the State Pension age for both men and women will start increasing in stages. It will reach:

  • 66 by October 2020
  • 67 between 2026 and 2028
  • 68 from a date that hasn’t been finalised – but it’s likely to be the mid-30s.

Important changes

The State Pension is changing. People who reach State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016 will receive a new State Pension with different rules.

This page explains what financial help is available if you are of pension age.

If you are of pension age and still working, the benefits listed in the previous chapters are also relevant to you.

If you receive a war pension or financial support from the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme, what you’re entitled to may be different from what is explained here. Ask a welfare rights adviser what this means for you – call our welfare rights advisers on 0808 808 00 00.


If you reach State Pension age before 6 April 2016

If you reach State Pension age before 6 April 2016, there are two parts to State Pension:

  • basic State Pension
  • Additional State Pension.

Under these rules, to receive the full basic State Pension, you need to have made national insurance contributions for at least 30 years. If you have made fewer national insurance contributions, you may still be able to get some State Pension but the amount will be lower.

The most basic State Pension you can currently get is £115.95 a week. Depending on your national insurance contributions, you may be entitled to more. This is known as Additional State Pension.


If you reach State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016

A new State Pension is being introduced for people who reach State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016. The aim of this change is to simplify the State Pension.

You will usually need 10 years of national insurance contributions to get any new State Pension. The new State Pension will pay at least £151.25 a week. You may be able to get more. The amount you get will depend on how many years of national insurance contributions you have made. The amounts will be decided in autumn 2015.

You won’t have to claim the new State Pension as soon as you reach State Pension age. By choosing to defer the State Pension, you could get more money when you do claim it.

For more information, visit gov.uk/new-state-pension or if you live in Northern Ireland, visit nidirect.gov.uk/pensions-and-retirement


Back to Benefits for people of pension age

Pension Credit

Pension Credit is a means-tested benefit for people who have reached the minimum age for State Pension.