Dave on loneliness and isolation

Dave sits on his own on a bench in a field.
Dave sits on his own on a bench in a field.

When Dave was diagnosed with prostate and kidney cancer he felt desolate and lonely, but he found that talking to his healthcare team helped to combat these emotions. 

He also logged in to the Online Community and was able to read posts by others going through a similar experience.

Dave's story

There were moments when I felt very alone. Waking up in the night and finding blood in your urine is a very lonely place to be.

On those sorts of occasions I had my nurse Gill, who I could call and speak to. I also had Val down at the local chemist who had also received training from Macmillan. I had my doctor and of course my partner Prue. But it still doesn’t change the fact that you can feel alone, no matter how much reassurance you get.

The fact you can’t do anything for yourself makes it a very difficult place to be. Even things that you take for granted, like having a shower or getting dressed. You can feel quite lonely then when you’re not able to do your own shoelaces up or put your own underpants on. You just feel desolate.

I have used the Macmillan Online Community and I have called the support line on a couple of occasions to talk things through with them. The Online Community has all the different cancers and chat rooms where you can talk to other people suffering with the same cancer as you. You can get a different perspective and encouragement. Hopefully you can also offer support and encouragement to those who are a little less far along the road than you are.

All of it has helped because you know you’re not on your own. You know there are other people going through the same things that you’re going through, the same emotional issues. It’s somewhere you can go for support. There’s always somebody willing to listen.

Watch: Dave's story

Watch: Dave's story