Just been diagnosed?

Finding out that you have cancer can be a shock, even if you already suspected it. It can cause many fears and emotions. You may feel anxious and uncertain about what will happen next. However, these days, many people are cured of cancer or are able to live with it for many years.

How we can help

Your doctor will explain the type of cancer you have and what tests and treatment you will need. But often it can be difficult to take in everything that is being said. We have information about:

For many people, a cancer diagnosis is life changing. Knowing what financial and emotional support is available can make the future seem a little less daunting. You can call us on 0808 808 00 00 to talk to one of our cancer support specialists, who will be able to answer any of your questions about living with cancer. This might include:

  • how cancer might affect your family and relationships
  • how to tell people about the cancer
  • how to cope with work and finances.

They can also tell you where to find a local support group, or how to access a counsellor. Or you may want to join our Online Community, where you can share your experience and exchange tips with others. We also have lots of information about cancer that you might find helpful.

You can also ask your healthcare team about anything that is important to you. There are no right or wrong questions. We have put together some questions, asked by people who have had cancer, which may help.

Being diagnosed with cancer

GP David Plume explains what to expect if you're referred by your GP for tests for cancer.

About our cancer information videos

Being diagnosed with cancer

GP David Plume explains what to expect if you're referred by your GP for tests for cancer.

About our cancer information videos

Cancer statistics

Some people may find it helpful to have some statistics when making treatment decisions. But while statistics can give you an idea of what may happen, doctors cannot say for certain what will happen for you.

Your doctor or nurse may use statistics when giving you information about cancer.

Cancer statistics are often used to:

  • say what a person’s risk of getting cancer is
  • help guide decisions about treatments
  • give information about prognosis and survival rates.

It is not unusual for people to find statistics confusing and difficult to understand. If you do not understand the statistics your doctor gives you, it is fine to ask them, or your nurse, to explain them again, possibly in a different way. You could also discuss them with one of our cancer support specialists.

We have more information about statistics that you may find helpful.

Back to If you have been diagnosed

Staging and grading

Knowing the stage and grade of a cancer helps your doctors decide on the best treatment for you.