Getting emotional support

It is very important to remember to look after yourself. You may feel overwhelmed by everything that is happening. But you should only ever take on as much as you can cope with.

Here are some things that can help.

Talk to someone

You could talk to a friend, a teacher or another family member. Or you may want to join a young carers’ group. Young carers’ projects can support you and give you time out from caring. They have groups where you can meet other young carers. You can chill out and no one will ask you why you are a young carer. Go to childrenssociety.org.uk to find one close to you. 

You can also chat with other young carers and support workers online. They can give you information and advice. Young carer workers can also talk to professionals and your school on your behalf.

Find a website or organisation that can help

We have details of lots of other organisations that can help you.

Let your school, college or work know

You may want to let your school, college or manager at work know what is going on. There may be times when you need extra help with your work, or when you need time off. Try and be honest about what is happening and the situation at home. That way, your teachers or employer can support you.

We have more information about talking to your school or college and your work.

Let people know what you are not comfortable with 

As a young carer, you might not want to (or might not be able to) do the same things as adult carers. And that’s okay. 

If you don’t feel comfortable doing something (for example, taking the person who has cancer to the toilet), you should tell someone. Another family member or friend might be able to help with those things. If there isn’t anyone else who could help, or you don’t feel like this is something you can talk about at home, you could try talking to a health or social care professional. They should be able to arrange for you to get some support. We have a list of health and social care professionals you might meet. You can talk to any of them.

Make time for yourself

Try to do things you enjoy. They can help you take your mind off the situation. We have more information about different things you could do.

Remember, you are still allowed to enjoy yourself and you don’t need to feel guilty for having your own life. Young carers’ services can provide opportunities for you to talk to other young carers and take a break from your caring responsibilities. You can search for a service near you at childrenssociety.org.uk

Young people looking after someone with cancer

Hear June, CAST Macmillan Young Carers Schools Coordinator, and young carers discuss the challenges young carers face and the importance of getting support.

About our cancer information videos

Young people looking after someone with cancer

Hear June, CAST Macmillan Young Carers Schools Coordinator, and young carers discuss the challenges young carers face and the importance of getting support.

About our cancer information videos

Back to If you are a young person looking after someone with cancer

Counselling

Counselling is support if you would like to talk to someone about your feelings.

Depression

You, or the person you look after, might feel very low at times.

Coping with death

Hearing that the person you are looking after is going to die can be very difficult, but there are people who can support you.