After treatment

When your treatment has finished, you’ll still have regular check-ups at the hospital. These might continue for several years. If you have any problems or new symptoms between appointments, let your doctor or nurse know as soon as possible.

You’ll probably be relieved that treatment is over. But you may still be coping with some side effects and have mixed feelings. Recovery takes time, so don’t be too hard on yourself.

There are things you can do to help improve your overall well-being. If you’ve had surgery, it can take time to adjust to changes in the way you now eat. Try to eat healthily – this can give you more energy and help your recovery. If you have eating difficulties or are losing weight ask your doctor or dietician for advice. If you smoke you may decide to improve your health by giving up. Gradually building up your physical activity can give you more energy.

Some people find it helps to talk about their experiences and feelings. You could share your story by becoming a Macmillan Cancer Voice.

After treatment for stomach cancer

After your treatment is completed, you’ll have regular check-ups at the hospital. These check-ups will probably continue for several years. Many people find that, for a while, they get very anxious before their appointments. This is natural. It may help to get support from family, friends or cancer support organisations during this time.

If you have any problems, or notice any new symptoms between check-ups, let your doctor or nurse know as soon as possible.

We have more information on coping with and after cancer treatment.


Well-being and recovery

After  treatment, you’ll probably be relieved that it’s over. But you may still be coping with some treatment side effects and with some difficult feelings. You’ll probably be very tired. Recovery takes time, so try not to be too hard on yourself.

There are some things you can do to improve your well-being. You might choose to make some positive lifestyle changes to make the most of your health.

Stop smoking

If you’re a smoker, giving up is one of the healthiest decisions you can make. Smoking increases the risk of smoking-related cancers and heart disease.

Eat healthily and stick to sensible drinking

If you’ve had surgery, it will take time to adjust to changes in the way you now eat. We have more information on eating after surgery which includes some helpful advice.

Try to eat healthily. This will give you more energy and help your recovery. Try to eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables – aim for five portions a day. Cut down on red, smoked and processed meats (such as bacon and sausages), and eat more chicken and fish.

If you drink, stick to sensible amounts. It’s recommended that men drink no more than three units a day or 21 units a week. Women should drink no more than two units a day or 14 units a week. One unit is half a pint of ordinary strength beer, lager or cider, one small glass (125ml) of wine, or a single measure (25ml) of spirits.

Be physically active

Being active helps to build up your energy levels. It also helps to reduce stress and the risk of other health conditions.


Share your experience

When treatment finishes, some people find it helps to talk about it and share their thoughts, feelings and advice with other people. We can help you share your story by becoming a Cancer Voice.