Daloni on talking to her children

Daloni is seated in a light room. Daloni's head is turned down and her daughter is resting her head on her mother's shoulder.
Daloni is seated in a light room. Daloni's head is turned down and her daughter is resting her head on her mother's shoulder.

Talking to children about cancer can be challenging, but as a parent you know your child best. When Daloni was diagnosed with an aggressive

form of womb cancer, she immediately thought about what she was going to tell her two children and how they would react to the news.

Daloni's story

When I received the diagnosis there was a clinical nurse specialist in the room. My first reaction was, 'What am I going to tell the children?' She said, 'Just tell the children you have some abnormal cells and you need to have an operation in the hospital to get rid of them.' And that was a really sensible piece of advice, because it was something that my children could not understand at the time.

I think my kids had completely normal reactions. My elder daughter was typical for her age group. She became quite selfish, and that’s a very normal thing for a 13-year-old to do. My younger daughter, who was 10, was very angry outwardly. She internalised all her worries and clung on to me.


I think it was very hard on my children and on my husband because they watched me lose all my hair with chemotherapy and basically lie on the sofa for the best part of a year. I wasn't able to do all the active things that I used to do before – dashing about, playing rounders, going swimming and all the other things that I used to do with the children. Suddenly I simply couldn’t. I needed to sleep a lot, to rest a lot. It’s only recently that I was able to mow the grass – that I had enough strength to do that.

Close-up of Daloni sitting at home in an interior setting.

Watch: all about Daloni's experiences

Watch: all about Daloni's experiences