Snapshots

It was during class time at St Mary's Primary School when seven-year-old Amy wrote a letter asking how she could become 'a nurse or a doctor who makes cancer go away'.

It was during class time at St Mary's Primary School when seven-year-old Amy wrote a letter asking how she could become 'a nurse or a doctor who makes cancer go away'.

Yvonne, Amy's teacher, had asked her class what's the one thing that would make the world better and big-hearted Amy chose this.

Amy's kind wishes also had a personal connection, as her Auntie Emma had recently been diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma. On finding out about Amy's letter, Emma recalls:

'I was surprised, it was lovely. She'd spoken about wanting to be a nurse when she was younger but that's the first time she has spoken outside the family about wanting to help others.'

Amy's passion to help her auntie and others - asking 'I am only seven, but how can I help?' is something her class teacher believes is important to encourage. She says:

'I try to instil a belief in my children that the world is theirs to change for the better. Macmillan gave my family a lot of support during my dad's illness, so I advised her to write to them as a starting point for her goal.'

After sending Amy a thank you card and wrist band, Macmillan arranged to visit St Mary's Primary School to talk to all the children about our work.

Amy's letter: Dear Macmillan cancer UK. My name is Amy Dolan, I am 7 years old and I hope you can help to make a cure for cancer. How can I ne a nurse or doctor who makes cancer go away? I am only 7 but how can I help now? Love from Amy Dolan.

Emma, a fundraising manager at Macmillan who went along to meet Amy, says:

'It can be difficult knowing how or what to explain to children when someone close to them has cancer. Our helpline advisors can help with information or how to word things if you need them for any unexpected questions.'

For advice on talking to children about cancer, please visit our Talking about cancer web pages.